End Of Tenancy Cleaning

When you move into a new property, it’s most likely very clean on your first visit. New tenants have a right to receive a clean and hygienic property, but they must also ensure the standard is maintained for the remainder of their tenancy.

Most people don’t do deep cleaning on a weekly basis and that counts double in the months before their moving date. However, when moving out, tenants need to make sure the property is just as clean as it was when they first moved in. Since moving is an already tense, both tenants and landlords turn to the services industry to fill in that role.
To fill in the demand, cleaning companies have introduced “end of tenancy cleaning” as a new service. In it’s core, end of tenancy cleaning is nothing more than you would do yourself with the bucket and mop. In detail, it’s a full top to bottom cleaning package designed especially for rented properties.


You will need to clean at minimum the following items, if you’re to pass the final inspection:

Kitchen – Empty all the cupboards and shelves. Remove all crumbs and deposits, clean inside and out and wipe thoroughly with a dry cloth. Do you best to pull out all appliances and wash the floors beneath them and the walls behind them. Make sure the appliances are clean, including the washing machine soap tray and the dishwasher filter. The back of most appliances are usually dusty and full of cobwebs – make sure to wipe them with a dry cloth. After you have cleaned the fridge, if it is empty switch it off at the mains and leave the door open to prevent mould. Make sure to pull out all fridge shelves, cabinets and racks. Clean them good including the groves where they slide in the fridge. Repeat this for each appliance with similar features.
Oven and hob – There is nothing worse than cleaning someone else’s oven when moving into a new property. If not cleaned often, the oven builds up thick layers of grime, burnt food deposits, grease and household dust. It all makes for a nasty cleaning job that requires the most time, effort and harsh cleaning agents out of all other cleaning jobs. Unpleasant though the task may be, make sure it is sparkling, as the oven is often the first item to be inspected. The same goes for the hob, burners, racks, baking trays, handles, switches and all other surfaces. You really need to put in the extra effort about your oven, or it’s not worth starting at all.


Living room – You need to clean the coffee table and all cupboards, cabinets, bookshelves and TV set. Living rooms often feature extensive decorations and full bookshelves. This room is mostly about dusting extensively and vacuuming everything to perfection. There are many items and awkward surfaces to clean, so easy as it might seem, the living room is very time consuming.


Bathroom – Scrub everything in the bathroom including the tiles, sink, bath, toilet, mirror and other accessories. Ensure the drains and plug holes are clear from debris and make sure the water runs away quickly. Remove mould, soap scum and limescale buildup from all metallic surfaces like the faucets, the shower, the drain grates. If the shower head has some of it’s holes plugged from limescale build up, you will have to clean it up. Detach the shower head and submerge it in white vinegar overnight. The day after, it should be cleared and working properly again.

Walls – You should look for any scuffs or dirty marks on the walls.  This is worth doing especially if there are a lot of marks, otherwise your landlord may decide to decorate and bill you for the cost! If you hanged any pictures or decorations on the walls there are probably a lot of nail holes. You don’t want your landlord to find too many of these, or they might throw a big fuss in the way of your pocket. fill holes where possible.  It’s important to clean all the mould if any and to also inform your landlord about the problem. Don’t paint over the mould – let the landlord do that, but try your best to remove it. Unfortunately, bleach is the most reliable cleaning agent against mould. Use a breathing mask and gloves when you use such harsh cleaning agents.


Windows – Clean all the windows from the inside. If you can’t reach the outside yourself then arrange for a window cleaner to call.  If there are any cracked panes arrange for them to be replaced unless they appear on the check-in inventory. Windows make quick impressions on the general hygiene. 

Curtains/blinds – If the curtains are washable then follow washing instructions or take them to the dry cleaner and dust the curtain rods. Do the same with any fabric blinds in the property. Thoroughly dust both sides of the slats of venetian blinds. Repair any damage or replace if the blind has become unusable.


Carpets/Rugs – It is recommended you use a professional carpet cleaner as hire machines can over wet the carpet and do more harm than good,


Staircases and hallways – These are areas with a lot of traffic and would be in need of more serious cleaning. The carpets and rugs might require steam cleaning to get all the dirt and grime out.


Garden and exterior – If there is a garden shed make sure it is clean and tidy. Hose down any decking and sweep up leaves and other debris from patio areas. Make sure that flowerbeds are in good order and mow the lawns where applicable. If the gate is broken and wasn’t when you moved in, repair it. If it was broken when you moved in there should be a record of it on the inventory, otherwise you will be held responsible.

Cleaning the whole property by yourself is a hard and arduous task.
You should consider whether you have the time and energy required to complete the task up to par, so you can receive your deposit in full.  This is the primary reason why you’re going through all of this in the first place. If you are cleaning by yourself, allow enough time to hire equipment, buy the right products, have things dry cleaned, and replace/repair items. Be thorough, tick things off your list as you go, take photographs when complete, 
When should you do end of tenancy cleaning yourself
You rent a small property or a room of a shared property
You rent an unfurnished property
You deep clean at least once every couple of months
You have a lot of time between moving and handing back the keys
You’re looking for a cheaper moving experience
You’re an experienced cleaner
When shouldn’t you do end of tenancy cleaning yourself
You are allergic to harsh cleaning products, like bleach
You cannot find enough free time or energy
You are not a good and thorough cleaner
You need to use professional equipment you cannot operate yourself